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Respect 101: It’s Time We Talked by Eileen Berry


You can spell it out in a song like Aretha Franklin, but any way you look at it, respect is the cornerstone of our society. It is so important it should be in capital letters – RESPECT – because this fundamental base forms the sum of our nation.

As the founder of Parenting Guides Ltd, a not-for-profit organisation providing resources for parents, carers and educators, I believe in the importance of instilling respect in our children to protect our future.

We have all seen recent public displays of disrespect whether it be online trolling, media figures mocking the disabled, radio jocks bullying staff or women being harassed in the workplace. AFL Collingwood president Eddie McGuire recently apologised to double-amputee Cynthia Banham after his negative comments when the number one Swans ticket holder struggled with the coin toss at a game against the Crows.

Some public examples of disrespect have had tragic results, such as the RM Williams teen model, Dolly Everett, who took her life after being bullied online.

AFLW star Tayla Harris was bombarded with misogynistic comments on a picture of her booting a fantastic kick, but she hit back saying she didn’t want to give “animals” oxygen. Now that’s a resilient, young woman and she gathered so much support.

But how do you make a child or young person resilient? You start with the basics. I have developed a new resource, RESPECT 101, with the support of the Federal Government’s Office for Women, because I am passionate about encouraging and developing the resilience of our young. Being respectful of yourself and others is a key and RESPECT 101 offers insights and advice to nurture our children.

RESPECT 101 is part of a suite of Parent Guides’ resources including Social Media 101, Sex 101, Drugs 101 and Mental Health 101, all developed to arm parents and others with knowledge in this ever-changing world. RESPECT 101 is an XYZ page resource, written by educational and psychological experts with input from students, educators and other teen specialists, designed as a starting block to build respect in children to develop their resilience.

It looks at how we, as adults, can provide positive role models while guiding our youth through today’s cyber minefields, and empowers children to be strong. This resource cuts across classrooms, sporting clubs, the home, the broader community and other places, to put kids on track where-ever they might find themselves.Respect 101 Booklet Cover

It considers relationships of all kinds but dwells on the most important – a child’s respect for themselves and how to build on this, and from there, with resilience, they will flourish. Experts in the RESPECT 101 resource look at family life and values, and the effect of family breakdowns and domestic violence on children. There are sections on the hot potatoes in today’s schools – sexism and equality, racism, social media and LGBTIQ+, as well as providing pointers to more assistance.

These resources are close to my heart. I wouldn’t be here unless I cared. Why does a childless, single woman care? By choice, I was a parent/carer of a nephew with serious substance abuse who now lives daily with mental health issues. Parent Guides was my response to the battle I faced finding resources and agencies to help my nephew and led to me to launching Drugs 101 at a parent night (Strathcona Baptist Girls Grammar) in 2015. It gave parents, carers and others the guidance and skills I wish I’d had as a carer.

As a group of professionals, we go from strength to strength, identifying the next challenges. We recently ran a teen suicide prevention project (funded by the State Govt), Suicide: It’s Time We Talked, tackling the once taboo subject of teen suicide using a professionally-written play by Alan Hopgood and an expert panel (GP, headspace and PoPsy) to dispell the myths that talking about suicide triggers an event.

Parent Guides create trust, credibility and confidence in families and our next projects include Gaming & Gambling 101, Resilience 101 and Money 101. We hope they will make a real difference.

For more information re parent information nights at your school see out Schools Contact Page or call us on 0407542655

 

Parents Must Model Respectful Behaviour


Parent Guides “tell it like it is”.

With the consequences of bad behaviour and broken relationships in the media spotlight, a new guide aims to help parents and carers to develop in their children a sense of respect.

Melbourne media identity Eileen Berry says many topical issues, such as violence against women and generally abusive behaviour, stem from a lack of respect. She says most people are respectful, but a significant minority do not demonstrate it in public or at home.

“This can result in sexism, racism, violence and other destructive behaviours,” she says.

Respect 101 is the latest in Eileen’s Parent Guides series. It helps families define respect and encourage it in their children. “Respect 101 identifies what respectful behaviour is, how to turn disrespectful into respectful, how to create life-long relationships and how to embed respect within the culture of adolescence,” Eileen says.

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Suicide – It’s Time We Talked



See the Play on the 29th of March. At Sacred Heart College, Retreat Road, Newtown – Geelong. Register and Get Your Free Tickets!

 

It’s time to talk about suicide:

A new and engaging production that combines a play about suicide with a panel of mental health experts will connect and bring people together in local communities.

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Mental Health 101: Experts to discuss stress and anxiety.


A local library will tackle the important issue of youth mental health and well-being, with an open and interactive free information evening. This event will be for teenagers, their parents and carers.

Casey Cardinia Libraries will host Mental Health 101: Stress and Anxiety. Based on the Mental Health 101 parent guide produced by Melbourne media identity Eileen Berry.

The event, held on 28 March, will discuss mental health and related issues such as drugs, sex and social media.

Eileen will join an expert panel from Headspace and PoPsy to inform and spark conversations about how to manage mental health and well-being.

She says mental health is a huge concern for young people, with suicide the leading cause of death among Australians aged 15-44 (source: ABS).

“Parents and carers want to know how they can help their kids become resilient, minimise mental health issues and deal with them when they do arise,” Eileen says. “We want to encourage important conversations between adults and kids that can help achieve this.”

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Pick My Project – Suicide: It’s Time We Talked

WE NEED YOUR VOTE

Suicide: It’s Time We Talked is a 35-minute play that addresses youth suicide in the online era and how young people can reach breaking point without their parents realising.

Jessica’s parents find suicidal comments on her computer when she climbs out her bedroom window. After giving her parents a scare, Jess discusses her concerns with them, including bullying and her friend Lindy’s suicide. The message is one of understanding and hope.

Written by theatre veteran Alan Hopgood AM, the play is followed by a 30-minute Q&A with an expert panel including PoPsy director and positive psychology advocate Marie McLeod and headspace manager and mental health social worker Kirsten Cleland. Read more

Children Need to Experience Failure to Thrive


Helicopter parents take an overactive and excessive interest in their child’s life.

All parents want the best for their child but they can become over-involved, smothering, overbearing, interfering and over-controlling. I also call them tow-truck parents because they wait for an accident to happen and then steam in and clear up the mess.

They have clear opinions about who is the right teacher for their child, what sport they should play, they want their child to be in the popular group and they offer disproportionate assistance, rather than allowing their teenager space.

These parents don’t enjoy uncertainty, so they over-prepare and supervise intensely and interfere with their child’s opportunity to do something for themselves and to deal with the natural consequences of their actions. Read more

I Was Bullied My Whole Life


Keiah Smith endured years of bullying through primary school and high school. She became depressed and attempted suicide.

I was bullied my whole life but it got particularly bad when I was ten and revealed I’d been sexually abused. I told a friend and it spread around the school and I was called a ‘slut’. I was also overweight and picked on for that, too.

At high school, I was regularly bashed. Mum and Dad told the school it wasn’t acceptable but it continued. I was bashed walking to class, during lunch and when I retaliated, I was suspended. It was heartbreaking and it’s hard to put into words how I felt. Read more

Youth Mental Health in the Spotlight


Parent Guides: ‘Tell it like it is’.

‘Honest and open conversation is a must for parents and carers dealing with teenagers mental health issues.’ Says a new resource that tells it like it is.

Melbourne media identity Eileen Berry says ‘Suicide, anxiety, depression, ADHD, self-harm, eating disorders and other mental illnesses are all taking a terrible toll on young people.’

But she says parents can help minimise these and other issues by educating themselves about building resilience in children by knowing how to approach problems if they arise.
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Principal endorses Parent Guides

In a video interview Heather Norton, former principal of Firbank Girls’ Grammar School, in Melbourne discusses Parent Guides with publisher Eileen Berry.

Heather said the school had been fortunate to get funding from their Parents Association to bring Drugs 101, Social Media 101 and Sex 101 to Firbank. “To be honest, I can’t think of a better use of the Association’s money. It cements the fact that we are raising our children together – parents and the school. We have received nothing but positive feedback from our parents and the benefits for our students are knowing that their parents are learning about issues that matter,” Heather said.

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